Why I Will Never Stop Blogging

Alltop, confirmation that I kick ass

I just recently learned that I was accepted by Alltop – that I will be included in their listing, which is a great honor for me and so I felt that I owed them an explanation of why I love blogging and why I will never stop.

In all my years of writing I have always felt that there were certain limitations placed upon me. Whether by a teacher for a school assignment, an essay contest, a grant proposal, an editor, you name it. But with blogging…I feel that with very few exceptions I can be totally free to express myself.

I have always loved words. I guess I can thank my overbearing 3rd grade teacher in part for that one. I was quite the talker in grade school, always eager to shout out the answer whether I had raised my hand or not. Her punishment was to have me copy dictionary pages while sitting in silent lunch. Truth be told I spent nearly the entire third grade in silent lunch and had copied that dictionary (EVERY PAGE) twice by the end of the year. But I guess It really did me some good though since after that I was placed in advanced classes(primarily due to my excellent vocabulary) and never again received a bad grade for behavior….ever. Thanks Ms.Taylor!

Anyways, back to writing, even before that I was always writing poems, short stories or drawing cartoons. I had so much in my head that I wanted to share. Some people got it and others wished that I would spend a little less time in fantasy land and concentrate on math and science more. I didn’t care though and by the time I was in high school I was winning awards for my creative writing.

As anyone who has followed this blog knows I discovered blogging in college and a new outlet for me was born. All of the sudden I was free to write pretty much whatever I felt like. I have never pushed to monetize this blog, it is simply my way of expressing all that I have swirling around in my brain. I love talking about public relations, which in many ways is simply good story telling and this is how I do it. So therefore, no matter how few readers, I will NEVER stop blogging. I now operate five blogs actually, each with a different purpose, each with a different style and I love all of them. I hope that you have the chance to one day visit them all.

What makes things even better is that I have passed on my inherent passion for storytelling and writing to my children as evident in The Adventures of the Little Red Car, a story-blog I am co-writing with my children based on semi-true events.

I also write about the crazy adventures I had while serving as a public affairs officer for a wildlife conservation agency for nearly three years, an experience that led me to become a conservation ecologist.

Dancing to the Music in my Head is a deeply personal blog where I write about my family, my friends and what it’s like to just be a crazy creative soul in a topsy-turvy world that is not always open or accepting of people like me.

The last one, Teaching with Technology was started as this one was, as a class blog and is not updated as regularly as I’d like it to be but I hope to get back to it soon for  it serves a valuable purpose, that of helping teachers and other educators (even non-traditional ones) of using this wonderful thing we refer to as social media to further education.

So I hope you will continue to enjoy reading as I enjoy writing it for you. Until Next time 🙂

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How Good a Story-Teller are You?

I hemmed and hawed for a couple of weeks over the subject of this post. I am right in the middle of several projects and quite frankly could have written about any of them but as I am going to be a guest lecturer in the one and only Professor Karen Russell’s Classroom this Friday I felt that topic of properly engaging an audience perfectly fitted the bill.

Okay, first a little background. Way back when I was a lowly undergraduate struggling along with the rest of my class to figure out where I was going in life, (I will admit to being a little more anxious than most of my fellow students seeing as I had about 10 years and 2 kids on most of them) I met a really cool teacher. For whatever reason, call it fate or whatever, we just sort of clicked. We had kids roughly the same age and we were both into this “new” social media revolution. She assigned the class to start a blog, and here five years later, I am still at it. I found something I love to do. Something I enjoy so much in fact that I actually have started several others for various reasons and have helped various non-profits set up ones of their own. Over the last five years, Karen has given me feedback, advice, and friendship and has rightfully earned the title of blogging mentor. Now on to the rest of this post.

I have been studying social media for the past four years. My teachers are people that you are probably pretty familiar with if you follow social media at all. I’m talking about Blog Bloke, Holly Hoffman, Tiffany Mollohan, Lisa Barone, Kelley Crane, Matt Chevront, Michael Margolis, Daren Rowse, Eric Qualman and course Chris Brogan. Some of these I met via Brazen Careerist, an awesome site that brings a whole bunch of us bloggers together regularly in a comfortable forum where we can bounce ideas off one another and share both good and bad ideas. Others I’ve met only in passing, either through Twitter or one of my blogs but I can honestly say that I’ve learned something valuable from each and every one of them.

Recently I have been reading a fantastic book by Annette Simmons entitled “Whoever Tells The Best Story Wins”. When I first started reading it, I will admit it was out of pure curiosity, being a writer and a storyteller by trade. By the time I realized it was actually a book geared towards marketers I was enjoying it so much that I kept right on reading, figuring that the lessons learned could very well apply to just about anyone who makes a living from stringing words together, whether in a sales pitch or an article in a magazine.

So how does this apply to social media? I mean this post is about what I plan to talk about as a THE guest speaker for the 5990H class at the University of Georgia on Friday so I guess I should get to the point.

Social media is like any other media in that those who have the gift of being able to intuitively tune in to their audiences are going to be the most successful. To be able to do this you have to be able to suppress your natural inclinations towards objective thinking, you know the type of thing that has been ingrained into us since we were barely knee-high. This idea that everything must be logical, must have a justifiable cause and effect. This thinking will only slow you down when it comes to getting in tune with those who will ultimately become your bread and butter.

Lost yet? Here is an example. say that a particular client loves the color red, songs by Bach and moonlit walks along the beach. You have been hired to create a social media campaign for a new brand of breath fresheners. Objectively speaking the clients subjective whims have nothing to do with the product. But putting objective aside you decide to do a couple of independent online surveys to see if any of the target audience may also have similar associations with their breath freshener products. 

As it turns out, your cleverly worded survey brings in surprising results. Putting objective numbers and statistics aside you decide to run with your campaign which features individuals being carried away by their breath fresheners….taken over in a dream like state. The video shorts were posted on YouTube and the Twitter and Facebook campaign solicited consumers to send in their own experiences with their favorite brand of X breath freshener, whether it be a magical proposal moment or just a fun moment.

The client was impressed.  They had expected a presentation of numbers, target markets, graphs and the like.Objective stuff.Instead they got a series of stories told right from the mouths of the consumers, The subjective. What better way to sell a product than to tell a great story. One that can be repeated over and over again.

So I ask you. How good a storyteller are you?

Being Green in Theory v. Practice

the ridiculous-nous of a dollarI must say that I am so tired of getting pile after pile of JUNK mail from groups (that for the sake of this post shall remain nameless…well that and I happen to be a card-carrying member of a few of them) that claim to want to save the planet in some form or fashion, whether it’s dirty coal one day or drowned polar bears the next…they fill your mailbox with pleas for your hard-earned dollar but seem to ignore one of the most basic and vital resources known to mankind as a species…clean air…produced in part by the very trees (some of them OLD GROWTH) cut down so that they could mail out their solicitations, most of which will never even be read, much less recycled and will likely wind up in some landfill taking up even more space and causing even more problems for these groups to complain about creating a new impetus for them to send out a whole new round of solicitations about these “new” problems to an uninterested public!

Whew! What an opening rant…

Ok, now let’s get serious folks. Yes I may be a hard-core environmental fanatic, but I make mistakes, have my failings, am outright lazy once in a while.(I sadly admit that even I have thrown away recyclable items without a twinge of remorse when tired, in a hurry with screaming toddlers strapped to both hips….) But, for the most part, I am working to be a responsible citizen, not just of my community, or even my country, but of my planet. I try to instill in my children the basic moral principles that less is more, and that homemade is from the heart. We avoid the big box retailers when possible, rarely eat junk, recycle regularly, endure the dirty looks we STILL get as we haul our cloth bags, walk more than drive and bundle up rather than crank up the thermostat.

Despite all these efforts, they can’t seem to avoid the barrage of mail we receive on a near daily basis asking for our support (which means money) and the really slick and cool ones promise that if we respond in 30 days we get a lovely reproduction 1930’s explorers backpack! How cool is that??

Just make sure you read the fine print…(you know the one that tells you that in exchange for that awesome backpack, only 5 cents of your $30 donation will actually help save the imperiled penguins, drowning polar bears or whichever cause it happens to be this month.)

Now please don’t assume I am bashing the wonderful work done by such groups as the Natural Resources Defense Council, The Nature Conservancy or the World Wildlife Fund. As a contributing member I do receive an annual report each year with an informative breakdown of how their money is spent each fiscal year. I study those charts and graphs ( and I am NO math major) and think to myself that a better use of such a  large chunk of  the money dedicated to marketing (to gain new members, raise more dues, and other advertisements) could be better spent on actually reaching out to college advocacy groups (the ones that are not afraid yet to write their congressmen and women and march on Washington in protest), providing grants to grassroots groups making real changes in communities,  etc.

To me it just makes more sense to spend that large  ( and I do mean large….well it is certainly many times more than I and probably most of my entire  staff make in a single year, but then I am a state employee so I guess I am probably not the best example to go by)

So for those of you out there…what are your thoughts on this???  Even using 100% recycled paper, should these organizations cut back their marketing and PR funding and maybe divert that money elsewhere where it might do more good? Please leave your comments below and let me know the following:

  1. Should these organizations reallocate their funding  to include more grassroots/ college advocacy movement workshop/events?
  2. Do These groups spend too much on marketing/PR/postage/etc?
  3. Is adequate research being done to ensure quality ROI for money and time spent?

I look forward to your time and answers. and if you feel more comfortable sending a more in-depth but private response, please feel free to email me a personal response.

I look forward to putting together these answers and then crafting a very nice letter to the presidents and CEO’s of some of these organizations, many of which I have faithfully supported in excess for more than 20 years. I want to know just how MY money has really helped (if at all beyond padding his or her salary while I struggle to feed my family) and whether or not they are truly following their own green  advice in both practice as well as theory…..

Until we meet again…..

Want to Help Fix the Economy? Be a Scrooge!

I read a great post this morning that totally fit in with what I was feeling. I tend to dread the holiday season. Not that I don’t enjoy spending time with the family, watching old Christmas specials like The Grinch Who Stole Christmas (my FAVORITE) and a Charlie Brown Christmas (2nd FAVORITE), eating my dad’s awesome Yule log (a lovely chocolate cake thing with maple flavored whipped creme…..aaahhhhhh……sorry having a Homer Simpson moment there) and sitting in front of a roaring fire. No, all those things are the essence of the holiday season for me.

What I hate is the shopping, the expectations, the greed, the consumerism, the obsession with STUFF we don’t need. Here is an excerpt from the blog that sums it up better than I ever could.

Go ahead...be a Scrooge for the planet!

Go ahead...be a Scrooge for the planet!

“We are in a mess. Actually we are in a bunch of messes. The financial collapse was caused in large part by our greedy and over consumptive nature and practices. Markets will not hold when so many people live lives based on an ever revolving line of credit, made necessary by the need to own more than one can afford.

The environmental mess we are in, is a direct result of over harvesting the planets resources to supply our consumptive society.

We are running out of nature… fish, forests, fresh water and minerals. We are running out of clean air, water and soil.

It’s not just about saving the planet though. It’s about returning to relationships that aren’t based on material gratification.

There’s only one way to avoid the collapse of this human experiment of ours on Planet Earth: we have to consume less.

It will take a massive mind-shift. You can start the ball rolling by buying nothing on November 27th. Then celebrate Christmas differently this year, and make a New Year’s resolution to change your lifestyle in 2010.” – Twilight Earth

I’m not saying that we shouldn’t give gifts to those we love, but what happened to homemade gifts, baked goods,  offers of services and other intangibles? Therefore I am not participating in the madness that is Black Friday. I will not step into any stores and will ignore the plethora of ads blasted at me from every direction. For once I am so glad I live in the boonies, have no TV and few radio stations that come in clear. Less media means less commercials to tempt me, or my children.

If you are a green organization trying to figure out how to convince people we need less, then definitely read the post I linked too and then try to help promote green gifts. Memberships and donations to green organizations such as your state government’s nongame wildlife program (which in Georgia relies entirely on donations and the sales of license plates), Green America, The Sierra Club or the Arbor Day Foundation who will plant a tree in honor of every donation, are all examples of gifts that not only reduce your carbon footprint, but will help to preserve the planet’s beauty for generations to come.

Another idea for green gifts – potted plants, framed comics from your local newspaper (print or online) that have special meaning, hand-made toys, blankets or scarves, and the list goes on. Last year a friend received a set of coasters made out of pop tops (mostly beer I admit) but they were so cool, and were an excellent form of recycling since many places that take bottles do not recycle the lids.

Want to help get us out of the greedy consumerist mess we are in, try not using your credit cards this holiday season. Be a scrooge, and save the planet.



Can Your Online Persona Strengthen Your Brand?

Not long ago I had a very interesting conversation via TweetChat with someone who is excellent at one thing, Branding.  We talked about how many of us bloggers have a unique online persona, one we share with the “world” as it may and one that may be different than our random everyday personality. Good or bad, it does happen and if you do it right, this may just  help you to succeed in the craziness of the online social media world.

From the feedback I received I realized that this idea is hardly new. Since the dawn of Hollywood and before, people have been using their public image to enhance their brand. I may not be a movie star, but many of the same techniques still apply. As a PR person, I learned many of these tricks and tips in school and thought I would now share them with you. So here is just a quick refresher on how to use your online identity (public persona) to help solidify your brand.

1. How important is a name? If you make a point to use your full name in all of your online interactions, that’s great…but remember that not everyone will agree and using your real name can inadvertently create enemies. As long as you remain thick skinned, this should be alright though. Another important thing to remember – if you use your name, all of your revelations whether they are professional or a rant against an insane boss are all linked to you. This can come back to bite you so if you choose to use your real name….be aware of the consequences that come with it. It is a good idea to go ahead and purchase your own domain while you’re at it. (oh and if you are curious…Google yourself and see what comes up – apparently I am an exotic dancer/stripper in Texas….who knew?)

2. According to Erik Qualman (@equalman) the author of the incredibly awesome book, “Socialnomics” , if you choose to develop your online brand based on a singular persona, (real or not) it is very important to have a singular image across all of your social media outlets. This may be a logo or even a picture. I really had no idea that one image could be that important, and then I felt silly since this is one of the first things hammered into your head in all advertising and marketing classes. We are a visual species, and more than remembering what is written, we will remember an image whether it is on Facebook, Twitter, MySpace, FriendFeed or a blog. Therefore, pick an icon/image/photo that truly represents your brand and use it across the web. Soon, those who are interested in you and what you stand for will begin to read your online responses, or notice your “ads” simply because they see your icon, regardless if they are actually interested in the topic of the blog post or article.

3. No matter how “big” you become online, remember that you have a life…in the real world. When approached or contacted to speak, give presentations, be a guest-poster etc, remember that you are representing both your online persona (the person/brand the world is familiar with through your blog) and you as a person. If there is too much of a gap then your brand awareness could become tarnished. No one wants to feel they have been lied too or led on. While this may seem contradictory, one of the main things I have learned is that although I have deveoped a brand through my work online, I am still me and that is the person that I want people to respect.

Have thoughts? Has your personal brand ever interfered with your personal (off-line) life? Please feel free to share.

’till next time!

Can Social Media Become an Agent of Conservation?

The following is an essay I wrote after watching “An Inconvenient Truth” while preparing to lead a class discussion on climate change. I think it neatly sums up why I do the things I do and is the first in a series of essays about using social media to effect real change for conservation.

I come to you today with what may seem like a radical concept. I admit that I have what some may consider a unique perspective on conservation, so what I want to do is to back up a little bit and tell you a little bit about how I came to feel this way.

As a child, I had a couple of events happen to my family that forever changed the way I looked at the world. When I was eleven years old, my house was destroyed by a tornado. This may not seem incredibly out of the norm for a weather event but the reason I say it began a shift was that I was living in suburban Marietta, Georgia at the time. Another factor is that I was home at the time and actually was right in the middle of my house being pummeled from all directions by a force that both terrified and awed me with its sheer power. We lost everything, except our lives. Yes that was traumatic, but what was even more traumatic, was what happened next. Of all the crazy things about that freak storm, this had to be the most bizarre. Despite our home being in ruins, the flattened street in clear view from the wreckage, the phone that was in our kitchen still had a dial tone. My father called 911. And this is where it gets even more interesting. The operator accused my father of making a crank call and hung up on him.

Let me fast forward a year or so. While on vacation to Lake Hartwell, my family decided to spend the night out in the lake on the houseboat we had rented. During the evening we received a distress call from another houseboat. They had hit a submerged stump and were slowly taking on water. They had a seven month old baby on board with them. You could hear the panic in their voices. The law enforcement guys from the area came on the radio and assured them they would be fine, that the houseboats were designed to take a little damage and that they would be okay until the sun came up when they could navigate back to the docks. I have never forgotten the words he told this frightened couple – “There is no way those boats will sink.” The man on board was a little skeptical and the LE guys gave them the option of attempting to beach the houseboat, which even to me, a twelve year old child, sounded ridiculous. The man cut off contact for a bit. My father paced a bit before hailing him on the radio. Turns out they were not far from us and with the help of a very bright spot light, the couple was able to hook up with us and come aboard. I gladly gave up my bunk for the exhausted little girl and her parents. The next morning, we stood in shock as only a foot or so of the boat remained above water.  Had they stayed aboard and gone to bed, they very easily could have drowned. An incorrect assumption that things would be as they always had been could have cost three people their lives.

So what does all of this have to do with conservation, natural resources and climate change? I’m getting there I promise.

Both of my childhood situations were made more difficult by one primary factor, human perception. These incidents helped my young mind begin to understand that people do not act rationally or logically most of the time.  We make decisions based on our unique life view, what we know to be true, in part based on the many events that have happened to us, our perceptions. We as humans also naturally look for the path of least resistance. Nobody wants to make their life harder than it has to be. Rather than consider what might be, we would rather slip back into the comfort zone of what we know, or rather what we think we know.

“1500 years ago, everybody knew that the Earth was the center of the universe. 500 years ago, everybody knew that the Earth was flat. And 15 minutes ago, you knew that humans were alone on this planet. Imagine what you’ll know tomorrow.” – Tommy Lee Jones (MIB 1997)

While I am not convinced that aliens live among us, I am fascinated by human behavior, in essence, why we do what we do. In trying to find my way in the world I bounced around some, psychology, sociology, education before settling on public relations and journalism.  Why? It seemed to me that both PR and journalism encompassed a little bit of all of the things I found fascinating. Story-telling, human behavior, trends, education, shifts in belief. I saw something in that method of communication that spoke to me, something that at the time seemed radical to me but intrigued me none the less. I wondered if I could channel this vehicle, if I could somehow continue my environmental and human rights advocacy work but with an entirely new focus. Could I use the tools and ideas learned from public relations to try and save the planet? I was called crazy. Everyone wanted to work for Coke, Procter & Gamble, the Finance sector, etc. I was told that I would never be successful, never be able to support my growing family. (I was almost six months pregnant with my third child when I graduated from college.) I felt differently.

I decided that I wanted to be a part of the Conservation Ecology and Sustainable Development program at the University of Georgia because although I believe in the science and the numbers, the facts if you will, I also believe that the science alone will not save us. Our planet’s main inhabitants, humans, are a highly reactive and emotional race. Individuals and organizations all over the world have made great strides, bringing us a long way in the process, but as a collective, we still have a long way to go.

“If Facebook were a country, it would be the fourth largest.”

Let me shift gears for a moment now and draw your attention to social media. Social media represents one of the greatest shifts in communications and human perception since the invention of the printing press.  It is transforming the way we live, do business and even survive.

I began to ask myself, how better to get through to people than by using something that is having such a dramatic shift in basic fundamental beliefs .

Have you ever been so passionate about something, so focused that everything else just fades away? Al Gore summed this up perfectly when talking about his son’s accident in the documentary, “An Inconvenient Truth”.  He said, “How should I spend my time on this Earth?” The life-threatening accident put the trivial into perspective.

Maybe I’m not making a fortune, but what I’m doing may have a profound effect on those that come behind me, my children, their friends, our collective descendants.

When Gore’s documentary was made, there was still a large controversy surrounding climate change. It was called a hoax, a fraud. Gore was called crazy. He stood by his convictions. It almost seems laughable, four years later with what we know now to think that climate change was ever considered “the biggest hoax ever perpetrated upon the American people.”

Let me go back for a moment to that tornado and the 911 operator. As my family huddled together, coated with blow-in insulation and misty February rain, what delayed the help we needed was that operator’s “knowledge” of the area, the weather reports, and what she knew to be true for storm history in the area. But in fact, she was wrong. The year after my neighborhood was ripped to the ground, the county purchased tornado sirens. When they were being constructed, some people complained. The towers were ugly, expensive and the majority of people felt they were unnecessary. There was a newspaper article that came out that explained to baffled county residents that even though the storm seemed to be a freak thing, it would be better for everyone if they were prepared in the future. Fourteen months after that first storm, the unthinkable occurred. I was at school when the sirens went off. My heart sank because somehow I knew. It ripped through my neighborhood and then hopped over the highway to exert wrath upon two other subdivisions and a trailer park. Two people died. When my mom called the school that afternoon, I knew. My teacher assured me that everything would be alright, that lightning simply didn’t strike twice. She was wrong. Although the damage was nowhere near as severe as before, it was simply incredible that it had hit the same homes two years in a row. Our brand new construction now had splintered gaps where the back porch had been, most of the pine trees lay on the ground, our camper turned upside down and smashed. People were amazed. This type of thing had never been a problem where we lived. This was new, and perception-changing.

It was only the start and there have now been regular tornadoes every few years around the state, both destructive and deadly. Things don’t stay the same because we want them too or even because we think they should. People’s views on climate change are like that. People who spend their time listening to radical pundits like Rush Limbaugh and firmly believe that global warming is a myth are in my opinion, desperately clinging to their outdated beliefs, not because they give credence to them, but rather out of fear. Fear of the dramatic shifts we are seeing all across the world. Social justice, climate change, human rights, war etc.

Those rabidly outspoken few, however misinformed, are not the scariest though. It is those who concede and say okay, yes the world is heating up, but who cares? There’s not much we can do about it anyway right? Those people are the ones I strive to understand. I have this idea that if I can just figure out what is going on in their heads that maybe I can change their mind. Isn’t that what advertising, commercials, PR, government and media have been doing ever since Edward Bernays, the father of modern public relations first spoke about the power of influence and public perception?

Okay, I don’t come from an incredibly strong scientific background. However, as I stated before, science alone can’t save us, which I think is the reason this master’s program is so popular. The teachers remind us that we must look beyond the numbers, to human behavior, community, economics, culture, media influence, etc. if we are to really and truly make a difference in the way we work to conserve what we have left and to make responsible and practical management plans that actually work. To repeat Gore, “What we take for granted might not be here for our children.” We can’t assume blindly that our actions however small, have no effect on the larger world. We can’t ignore what is happening all around us.

“No one can do everything, but everyone can do something” – WE ADD UP 2009

I was told that the climate change debate is an ethical, moral and philosophical issue and I agree. I only need look around to see that our world is consumed with the trivial, the superficial and the irrelevant. Why? Maybe I am crazy, and overly sensitive, but when I see trash on the road, people with fifty plastic grocery sacks, or people refusing to believe that all species have the right to exist, I feel physically ill.

I was hired only about six months after I graduated college, by the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, as a public affairs specialist, a job I continue to hold. What I have learned has taken my breath away, has made the trivial insignificant. I learned through practical experience what amazing resources we have on this planet. I couldn’t believe that I hadn’t learned this before and as a new “recruit” I couldn’t understand why others wouldn’t find it as awe-inspiring as I did.

I made up my mind that I would make a difference, somehow. I dove in to education, greedily devouring everything I could on why people behave as they do when it comes to conservation. I wanted to understand the concept of “buy in” and what is the determining factor that either makes an individual, organization or industry finally say, ok, we will work with you. I wanted to know if in fact there was a way to accurately measure behaviors so we could see where the change occurs.

“People play various roles in their own lives and take on different personalities depending on where they are or with whom they are interacting. People have their work personas that are much different from their nightlife personas, which in turn are different from their family personas and so on.

The same holds true for corporations; on one hand, a company donates millions to save-the-planet-type funds, but on the other hand, they dump millions of gallons of toxic waste into the clean water supply.

The transparency and speed of information flow caused by social media mitigates this type of social schizophrenic behavior. What does this mean for companies and individuals?” – Erik Qualman (Socialnomics 2009)

I ask, what does this mean for those fighting for conservation?  Will social media help improve transparency enough to actually change behavior? I think so. That is what I want to find out.

Does Sensationalism Help or Hurt Conservation?

greenpeace activistAnyone familiar with conservation knows that there are those who prefer to make headlines rather than make actual headway on the issues. Not that these tactics don’t have their place – there are times when the only way to get attention for your cause is to make a bold move.

The trick is to know when splashy headlines and other sensational PR strategies will work and when it is better to maintain a slightly lower profile. While impressive when they work, these types of strategies have a low success rate and in some cases may do more harm than good.

When Greenpeace activists dangle from bridges, disrupting traffic, costing consumers time and money in the process, are they really furthering their cause, or are they actually moving backwards?

Another example – consider the group PETA. Many people automatically associate PETA (which actually does accomplish good things) with extreme activist methods including dumping animal remains into cars, throwing paint onto wearers of fur, breaking and entering and destruction of private property. The question you have to ask is: What has all of this done for actually furthering the cause of ethical treatment of animals? Case en point: If you ask the average Joe on the street what they know about PETA more often than not you get an anecdote about the groups reputation rather than something positive they have achieved. What’s worse, most of those same individuals are not even sure what PETA even stands for. (To be fair, many of the things they are associated with are no longer tolerated by the group, however the negative reputation remains.)

So how do you know when your extreme tactics are working and when it might be better to maintain a lower profile? Here are a few tips I’ve learned from my days of crazy over-the-top activism.

  1. Consider your audience – young people may become inflamed about an issue, but have little money to give. Do you need funds or simply a voice? Knowing this can help you decide who you want to reach and those you would prefer NOT to alienate.
  2. Have a plan – just because an action seems crazy doesn’t mean there is not a carefully laid plan behind it. Most publicity stunts are actually the result of a carefully scripted plan.
  3. Have a plan B – always have a contingency plan in place and know when to re-evaluate and maybe back off.
  4. Always look at the big picture. Maybe your crazy stunt will get some press coverage but don’t fall for those who insist that any press is good press. If you gain a few extreme followers but lose out in the short run, as many extremists do eventually become more moderate with age, are you potentially losing your future supporters.

Bottom Line: Always think first. Maybe having a hundred body bags dumped on the front steps of a leading tobacco company makes for great press and awesome commercials- that does not mean that those type of tactics will necessarily work to stop big business from destroying the last known habitat for a rare turtle.

Conservation must take into account a larger ecosystem/landscape approach if we are to truly make a difference. We as a species must consider that there is more than just a few animals and plants at stake. Understanding the psychology, culture, history and economics of a particular conservation issue will help to create smarter management plans that just may work, and probably better than just shouting at whaling vessels with a megaphone. GERMANY  G8 PROTEST